A website endorsed by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon aims to collect 1million signatures from youth in the final 100 days to COP15

With just 100 days to go until the critical U.N. Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen (COP15), a Web campaign launched today with the aim of uniting 1 million global youth on a declaration that calls for a bold new climate treaty to safeguard the future of our planet.

In addition to signing the declaration, which will be handed over to the host of COP15 the Danish Government in December, the website www.PlanetCall.org, which is endorsed by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Danish Minister for Climate and Energy Connie Hedegaard, also asks young people to make their "Call" for the solutions they feel should be supported by a necessary successor to the Kyoto Protocol.

The initiative is spearheaded by the Copenhagen Climate Council, the Scandinavian think tank Monday Morning, and five youth organization from Europe, China, India, and the United States: AIESEC, China Youth Climate Action Network, Energy Action Coalition, Energy Crossroads, and India Youth Climate Network.

Erik Rasmussen, founder of the Copenhagen Climate Council and CEO and Editor-in-Chief of Monday Morning, who is cited by the World Economic Forum as one of the 100 most influential journalists globally, said: "We owe it to young people that they have their say. It is their future, their quality of life, which is at stake. If the treaty in Copenhagen shall claim a lasting sustainability it has to include ideas and reflections from global youth. The ambition with PlanetCall is to offer a shared platform for young people and youth organizations all over to world to ensure they have maximum influence on their own future."

Famous names such as Tim Flannery, and green innovator Shai Agassi, among others have also posted a Call or feature in videos on the site, to inspire youth. Further calls to youth in video and text form from celebrities and others will also be revealed week by week, counting down to COP15.

The site also showcases the best solutions videos and encourages youth organizations all over the world to sign up and share their work and ideas, uniting for climate and forging the biggest ever youth coalition to present a climate declaration to decision-makers on climate.

Stakeholder Forum is presenting a workshop designed to enhance the capabilities on stakeholders to engage and influence decision makers

Stakeholder Forum is presenting a workshop on the 19th of October in London designed to enhance the capabilities on stakeholders to engage and influence decision makers.

Stakeholder Forum has played a key role in helping a diversity of stakeholders to engage with UN processes over the past 25 years, it has produced two publications on engaging with UN processes How to Lobby at Intergovernmental Meetings and Negotiating and Implementing MEAs.

This course draws on this valuable experience and will greatly enhance your ability to engage with the UNFCCC process. The course is broke into a number of components drawing on a range of expertise from a number of stakeholders, including government, civil society and the media.

Costs are:

NGO/Charities: £150 (plus VAT)

Government and Local Authorities: £200 (plus VAT)

Business: £250 (plus VAT)

Please go to http://tinyurl.com/howtolobby for more information and booking details.

2009 Governors' Global Climate Summit 2: On the Road the Copenhagen

September 29-October 1, 2009 at the The Hyatt Regency Century Plaza, Los Angeles, USA

The goal of the Summit is to deepen and broaden cooperative efforts by sub national governments to implement strategies that can immediately grow a green economy, increase the use of sustainable clean energy, reduce dependence on oil and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in advance of, and in support of, the next global agreement on climate change.

The Summit is expected to be attended by the environmental executives , green product purchasers, corporate executives, global diplomats, international reporters, and academics.

For more information on the Summit please click here.

Science Reinforces Human Role as Climate Change Impacts Accelerate

World Resources Institute (WRI) published a new report of scientific findings which confirms not only that human activity is the primary cause of rising temperatures, but that climate change impacts are accelerating.

The compilation of peer-reviewed research includes evidence that melting rates for mountain glaciers around the world doubled between 2004 and 2006, and that more than 28,000 plant and animal species are changing habits due to new climatic conditions.

"Climate change impacts are happening now. This is not a distant phenomenon. And many impacts are emerging at a faster rate than previously modeled," said Kelly Levin, an associate at the World Resources Institute who co-authored Climate Science 2008: Major New Discoveries with Dennis Tirpak, WRI senior fellow.

Levin said the trends may seem less surprising because we are inundated with so many stories about global warming. But as a co-author for the past four years of WRI's annual compilation, she added that the repeated reconfirmation of trends should support the need for rapid and substantial greenhouse gas mitigation and adaptation efforts worldwide.

WRI's review includes peer-reviewed 2008 science and technology publications, including those from key general scientific and technical journals.

Handbook for Conducting Technology Needs Assessment for Climate Change

In 2004, the Expert Group on Technology Transfer and the UNFCCC secretariat worked with the United Nations Development Programme to prepare the first Handbook for conducting technology needs assessments for climate change. The handbook supported the preparation of technology needs assessments by developing countries which have stimulated a wide range of technology transfer initiatives in developing countries.

To share best practices and lessons learned with conducting technology needs assessments and to identify specific needs and practical actions that could assist Parties in implementing the results of TNAs, a workshop on best practices with conducting TNAs was organized by the EGTT and UNFCCC secretariat in Bangkok, Thailand on 27-29 June 2007. The workshop provided an opportunity for countries' experts to exchange views with representatives from the private sector in particular the financial community on possible ways to enhance access to funding for the implementation of the results of TNAs. In this context, regional training sessions on project development are being conducted for participants from developing countries utilizing a UNFCCC guidebook for preparing technology transfer projects for financing.

Lessons learnt from the workshop have been drawn upon in developing this updated Handbook on technology needs assessments for climate change. The updated Handbook provides a more detailed framework for the development and implementation of technology needs assessments and in particular in the development of technology programmes and strategies in developing countries. It also seeks to support capacity building and to help with the establishment of the enabling environments for technology transfer.

The publication of this handbook is the result of the dedicated efforts of all those involved in its production, the United Nations Development Programme and the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in collaboration with the Expert Group on Technology Transfer and numerous practitioners engaged in the development of technology transfer projects in developing countries.

Bonn III: IISD Summary and Analysis

Summary and Analysis:

From 10-14 August 2009, the Ad Hoc Working Group on Long-term Cooperative Action under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (AWG-LCA) and the Ad Hoc Working Group on Further Commitments for Annex I Parties under the Kyoto Protocol (AWG-KP) held intersessional informal consultations in Bonn, Germany. Approximately 2,400 participants attended the meeting, which forms part of ongoing negotiations on long-term cooperation under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol.

The two AWGs are scheduled to conclude their work by the fifteenth session of the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP 15) and the fifth session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (COP/MOP 5) to be held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2009.

The Bali Road Map: Key Issues Under Negotiation in 2009

Evolving Financing Proposals and Positions in the UNFCCC Negotiations

This paper describes some of the proposals and positions feeding into the negotiations on a future financial architecture for climate change under the UNFCCC as of July 2009. The proposals referenced in the paper have been submitted by Parties and civil society observers to the Ad-Hoc Working Group for Long-Term Cooperative Action (AWG-LCA). Many of the issues arising from these proposals that relate to support for adaptation, technology, and nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) were discussed with experts from a range of perspectives to inform the analysis. Some issues are not explored in this paper (e.g., Reducing Emissions from Deforestation in Developing Countries (REDD), Clean Development Mechanism). While the negotiating texts will evolve and details will continually change, this paper identifies the broader directions that are emerging, and raises a number of implementation level questions that must be explored further.

Bonn Climate Change Talks: 10-14 August 2009

The International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) is publishing updates from Bonn III in various formats:

1) Follow @enbclimate on Twitter for occasional updates each day on the status of the negotiations: http://www.twitter.com/enbclimate

2) Photos and links to daily Earth Negotiations Bulletin reports in English, French and Japanese http://www.iisd.ca/climate/ccwgi/

3) Subscribe to daily email delivery in HTML or PDF of the Earth Negotiations Bulletin at http://www.iisd.ca/email/subscribe.htm (choose ENB)

The World Resources Institute's annual review of climate science

Science Reinforces Human Role as Climate Change Impacts Accelerate

A new report of scientific findings confirms not only that human activity is the primary cause of rising temperatures, but that climate change impacts are accelerating.

The compilation of peer-reviewed research includes evidence that melting rates for mountain glaciers around the world doubled between 2004 and 2006, and that more than 28,000 plant and animal species are changing habits due to new climatic conditions.

"Climate change impacts are happening now. This is not a distant phenomenon. And many impacts are emerging at a faster rate than previously modeled," said Kelly Levin, an associate at the World Resources Institute who co-authored Climate Science 2008: Major New Discoveries with Dennis Tirpak, WRI senior fellow.

Levin said the trends may seem less surprising because we are inundated with so many stories about global warming. But as a co-author for the past four years of WRI's annual compilation, she added that the repeated reconfirmation of trends should support the need for rapid and substantial greenhouse gas mitigation and adaptation efforts worldwide.

The report is broken into four sections, which include some of the following sample findings:

Physical Climate:

The rate of growth of global carbon dioxide emissions between 2000 and 2007 was four times that of the previous decade.

A large majority of warming over the last century can be attributed to human activities rather than natural factors, such as solar variability.

If atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations reach 700 parts per million by 2100 (concentrations in 2008 were 385.57 parts per million), daily maximum temperatures are projected to rise to 104 degrees Fahrenheit in the U.S. Midwest and Southern Europe and exceed 122 degrees Fahrenheit in Australia, India, the Middle East, and parts of Africa.

Sea ice loss in the Arctic could have the potential to warm ground up to 930 miles inland, threatening to trigger "rapid degradation" of permafrost.

This section includes studies in the areas of abrupt change, GHG and aerosol concentrations, temperature, and ocean behavior.

Hydrological Cycle:

From 1996 to 2006, the rate of ice mass loss of Antarctica increased by 75 percent.

The rate of melting and thinning of 30 glaciers across nine mountain ranges around the world doubled between 2004-2005 and 2005-2006.

Up to 60 percent of the hydrological changes in the Western United States are due to human activities, a trend which, if sustained, "portends a coming crisis in water supply."

This section includes studies in the areas of glacial and snow melt, water supply, and storms.

Ecosystems and Ecosystem Services

Changes in 28,800 plant and animal systems and 829 physical climate systems have led scientists to conclude that human-induced warming is already "having a significant impact" on natural and physical systems.

Due to climate change-induced beetle infestations, the forests of British Columbia will turn from a small net sink of carbon dioxide to a large net source by 2020, with emissions trumping those related to forest fires.

If carbon dioxide emissions continue unabated, tropical ocean "dead zones" are likely to increase by 50 percent by 2100.

This section includes studies in the areas of both marine and terrestrial ecosystems.

Mitigation Technologies

A promising method of capturing carbon dioxide directly from the air is under development.

A new non-toxic, inexpensive technology for storing solar energy, with potential applications for generating hydrogen power, has been discovered.

This section includes studies in the areas of solar, thermoelectric, biofuels, wave energy, batteries and ultracapacitors, and carbon capture.

WRI's review includes peer-reviewed 2008 science and technology publications, including those from key general scientific and technical journals. Available for download at: http://pdf.wri.org/climate_science_2008.pdf

I&FF Trainings

A key challenge for developing countries is understanding the magnitude and intensity of national efforts needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change. To address this issue, one key national activity under the UNDP EEG global project, Capacity Development for Policy Makers to Address Climate Change, is an assessment of investment and financial flows (I&FF) to address climate change for selected key sectors. Undertaking the assessments will require the involvement of various line Ministries, decision-makers, and other stakeholders across the key sectors at the national level. The work will be supported by UNDP and regional centers of excellence.

To support countries in this exercise, UNDP has commissioned a User Guidebook comprising:

1) Workplan guidance for preparing for an I&FF assessment,

2) Methodology Guidebook for the Assessment of Investment and Financial Flows, and

3) Reporting Guidelines.

On 13 August, UNDP is holding an informational session on the margins of the climate sessions in Bonn to share lessons learned in recent I&FF trainings. See agenda attached (in English).

Welcome to UNDPCC.org!

This Climate Community site (UNDPCC) has been designed as a knowledge platform that goes beyond the provision of tools and resources to build communities of practice around national priorities, thematic issues, and other areas of interest. We invite you to be active users of the site. Some of the ways that you can help build knowledge are by joining groups to share experiences and uploading documents to the multilingual library.

Below are some ways to make the best use of this site. You can also visit the Frequently Asked Questions section for more detailed guidance.

Choose your language:

The site currently supports English, Spanish and French languages. After you have joined the site, go to "Edit" (in the top right corner) to update your profile. Under "Profile Options", you can select either English, Spanish or French under "language".

Join groups:

This site features both private and open groups . The private groups are for countries participating in the UNDP project, Capacity Development for Policymakers to Address Climate Change, and require approval from the group administrators to join. However, there are also public thematic groups that anyone can join.

Sign up to the What's New section:

You can choose to have either RSS Feed notifications, or emails sent directly to your inbox. RSS (or Really Simple Syndication) is simply a different format that is popular on the web for informing you of updates to a website.

Browse the publications database and upload documents:

There are currently more than 600 documents in multiple languages in the publications database that can be searched by key words, language, type of publication, country, and year of publication. You can also submit publications to the database.

For documents related directly to the project, go to the project documents page.

Let us know what you think:

We welcome your feedback on this site! You'll find our contact information on the Contact Us page.

Bali Action Plan Briefing Documents

UNDP commissioned a series of papers on the Bali Action Plan building blocks in the lead-up to the 14th Conference of the Parties, which was held in Poznan, Poland, in December 2008, under the global project, "Capacity Development for Policymakers to Address Climate Change". The briefing papers were authored by leading developing and developed country experts and are available in English, French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic and Chinese. They were made possible by funding from the United Nations Foundation and the governments of Norway and Finland.

You can download the documents separately, or as a compilation publication, from the Project Documents section of our website or from the Publications Database.

The documents are:

The Bali Road Map: Key Issues Under Negotiation (compilation document)

The Bali Action Plan: Summary for Policy Makers

National Policies and their Linkages to Negotiations over a Future International Climate Change Agreement

Climate Change Mitigation Negotiations, with an Emphasis on Options for Developing Countries

Negotiations on Additional Investment and Financial Flows to Address Climate Change in Developing Countries

Adaptation to Climate Change: the New Challenge for Development in the Developing World

Mitigation Technology Challenges: Considerations for National Policy Makers to Address Climate Change

Key Issues in Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry, with an Emphasis on Developing Country Perspectives

National Dialogues Continue

Four National Inter-Ministerial Dialogues will be held this month - in Costa Rica (6-7 May), Honduras (14-15 May), and St Lucia and Togo (20-21 May). This will mark the halfway point in the organization of these workshops under the project, with eight more Dialogues planned from June to August, and eight already completed between September 2008 and April 2009.

The Dialogues are designed to raise awareness about the key issues and elements of the Bali Road Map with stakeholders from key government ministries and departments (e.g., finance, planning, energy, agriculture, forestry, and health), as well as the private sector, non-governmental organizations, parliamentarians, and civil society. Increasingly, developing countries - in particular those with lower and middle-incomes - need to co-ordinate the views of these various stakeholders in order to successfully participate in the international climate negotiations process. Strengthening government capacity to develop, implement, and evaluate cross-sectoral national policy options in response to the international negotiations can offer policymakers a key opportunity to move toward sustainability.

To view the reports and other materials from previous national dialogues, visit the country pages.